SEE International

For 44 years, Santa Barbara-based Surgical Eye Expeditions (SEE) International has been providing restorative eyesight care around the globe. The non-profit organization, founded by local ophthalmologists in 1974, relies on volunteers, grants and donors to make its important work of reducing preventable blindness possible. And as it heads toward 50 years, SEE is endeavoring to treat more patients than ever before. “There are 36 million people in the world who are blind, up to 75 percent of those are blind from preventable conditions,” said Matt Wheeler, vice president of communications for SEE. “One of the major problems is that 80 percent of these people are living in areas of the world where access to care is not available.” Cataracts, one of the leading causes of blindness, can often easily be treated – but patients must have access to qualified ophthalmologists who can perform a simple surgery. Partnering with local ophthalmologists in every region where they work, SEE volunteers made 250 trips to over 40 countries this year, and performed 40,000 sight restoring surgeries. Volunteer doctors pay for all of their own travel and housing expenses and receive no pay for their work. By 2020, SEE aims to perform 100,000 surgeries a year. In the course of the organization’s existence, volunteers have conducted 4 million eye exams and performed a half million surgeries. Other work includes training regional doctors on cataract surgery techniques, providing supplies for clinics that don’t have access to proper materials, and conducting preventative eye exams in impoverished areas. In assessing the support it has received from corporate sponsors over the years, SEE staff realized that one Santa Barbara-based company was unique in terms of longevity and generosity of support – and happened to be a close neighbor, too. “Our leadership was...

Promoting Awareness Oct05

Promoting Awareness

October is Domestic Violence Awareness Month, and Santa Barbara County’s Domestic Violence Solutions (DVS) has planned weekly events to bring this societal epidemic out of the shadows and into the light.   Candlelight vigils to bring attention to the prevalence of domestic violence across America are set for Lompoc (Oct. 11), Santa Maria (Oct. 18) and Santa Barbara (Oct. 25). Since its start in 1977, DVS has aimed to educate the public while creating a pathway of hope for those who experience domestic abuse firsthand. It is Santa Barbara County’s only full-service domestic violence agency, committed to ending the cycle of domestic violence through prevention and intervention services. With support from state and federal funds, grants and corporate and private donations, DVS provides the county’s only 24-hour shelter service, as well as the county’s only transitional housing program for domestic violence survivors. To fully illustrate its impact and the need for such services in Santa Barbara County, in 2017 DVS: Answered almost 5,000 calls to its 24-hour crisis and information lines Provided 4,687 safe nights to victims of domestic violence Responded to over 472 calls from law enforcement and emergency rooms at the victims’ location Participated in 244 educational and outreach events throughout the community Sheltered as many children as adult victims of domestic violence The Yardi Foundation is a longtime support of DVS’ work to help domestic violence survivors and their families get back on their feet, and educate the community at large about how to stop the pervasive cycle of violence. “We’re very grateful for the support we’ve gotten from Yardi. They’re a wonderful Santa Barbara company and we truly appreciate their contributions,” said DVS executive director Jan Campbell, the former chief philanthropic officer of the Santa Barbara Foundation. Campbell, who took...

Food for Thought

Yardi’s corporate culture includes a focus on community service. In the Yardi Boise office, a team of employees focused professionally on the senior living product suite decided to bring that value to life by participating in two local efforts aimed at combating hunger. First, staff partnered with Metro Meals on Wheels to serve 80 seniors in the community. Since many of the elders that benefit from Meals on Wheels are homebound and unable to prepare their own food, they rely on meal delivery as their primary source of nutrition. The Boise office team was happy to help with distributing food, cleaning, and socializing with seniors. Metro Meals on Wheels serves meals to nearly 1,000 Boise senior citizens each weekday and over 700 each weekend. Inspired by their work with Meals on Wheels, the team sought a new philanthropic challenge, this time joining with the Idaho Foodbank. The independent non-profit organization is entirely donor supported and is the largest food bank and distributor of free food assistance in Idaho. One in seven Idahoans are in need, and the food bank is making strides to not only provide meals but to promote healthy, locally-sourced foods. In fact, three quarters of the food distributed by the Idaho Foodbank is fresh or fresh frozen versus shelf stable, up from just fifty percent six years ago. So when the organization was hosting a food drive, the Yardi staff was excited to participate. This time, they volunteered to put together meals for the federally sponsored Seniors’ program and gathered donations of juice, cereal, milk and eggs into individual meal boxes. In all, the 60 employees assembled 15 palettes of meals, estimated to contain an amazing 14,000 pounds of food, to be distributed to local seniors. That’s more than enough to...

Food Bank Fridays Sep05

Food Bank Fridays

Staff at the Yardi Milton Keynes office are cleaning out their home pantries. But they’re not checking for expiration dates—they’re collecting items for the Milton Keynes Food Bank. Located in Buckinghamshire, about an hour northwest of London, the Yardi UK office employs over sixty team members, and they hope to make a big impact. As part of Yardi’s philanthropy program, the UK team started a charity committee. They sent out a survey to gather feedback and decide which charities to support as a team. The group wanted to keep things local and at first chose a handful of organizations to contribute to. But after the initial charity drive, members of the team had a desire to get involved with something a bit more hands-on. Hannah Holmes and Martin Gedny from the marketing team took a trip to the local food bank. Both learned a great deal about the types of people who benefit from the organization. “It was such an insightful experience that we decided to get involved, and at the very least, set up a donation box,” said Hannah Holmes, marketing associate. “The collection has been a massive hit, and it’s just a start. We want to also encourage team members to get down there and volunteer as well,” said Martin Gedny, senior manager, EMEA marketing. The Milton Keynes Food Bank, recipient of the Queen’s Award for Voluntary Service, aims to educate locals about the realities of hunger in the area. Long believed to be an issue only in developing countries, hunger is a very real threat; even in prosperous communities, many families live on the edge of poverty. And since the food bank relies entirely on contributions from local schools, churches and businesses, every donation counts. Each week, the team checks the...

Ash Kicking Continues Aug31

Ash Kicking Continues

Yardi was recognized for its contributions this week as the lead corporate sponsor for the Kick ASH Bash, which raised $1.3 million for distribution to local first responder agencies. Among the purchases with those funds are three new mobile command units to be used during onsite response to events like fires, floods and other public safety crises. The first MCU has been received by the Santa Barbara County Fire Department and was on display at a press conference this week. According to Eric Peterson, Fire Chief for the Department, the unit has already been put to good use. “The trailer had its maiden voyage during the recent Holiday Fire.  It provided a perfect place for the team to work, and allowed a level of collaboration that we have not had before. Having a place to work and discuss tactics and planning immediately during an incident makes a huge difference,” Peterson said. The Kick ASH Bash was the largest local philanthropic event held in the aftermath of the Thomas Fire last December and deadly Montecito mudslides that followed the fire in January. In addition to financial support, many Yardi employees served as volunteers at the event, held in February at the Nesbitt Bella Vista Estate in Summerland. Yardi and Executive Vice President Gordon Morrell were singled out for their efforts in supporting the fundraising efforts. “(Yardi) jumped up big time from day one. We really appreciate their support,” said Eric Phillips, co-chair of the event. Funds are being distributed through the non-profit Santa Barbara County Firefighters Alliance, an organization that raises money for public safety equipment that is outside of departmental budgets. “Our goal is to protect the firefighters’ safety, just as they protect our safety every day,” said Susan Petrovich, president of the Alliance. “We want to ensure that they have safe, start-of-the-art, high tech equipment so that they can do their jobs.” Petrovich said that it had been the goal of the Alliance to provide a mobile command unit for some time, but wasn’t sure where the funds would come from. “This is amazing for us. We are so grateful for this event and for the proceeds.” “These units will benefit every single resident in Santa Barbara County. Wherever there is an emergency, this will help our first responders collaborate and communicate more effectively,” said Richard Weston-Smith, an executive board member of ONE 805, the organizing force behind the fundraiser. “Our first responders don’t just need support occasionally. They need it year in and year out.” Learn more about ONE 805 and their efforts to help Santa Barbara County first responders here. Learn more about Yardi’s philanthropic and volunteer efforts...

Supporting Foster Kids Aug29

Supporting Foster Kids

The Yardi Marketing Department recently gathered for its second annual summer conference in Goleta, Calif, and the event concluded with a community service activity that was especially meaningful to two members of the team. Marketing Department Members used their creativity and empathy to decorate duffel bags for Santa Barbara County children in the process of being removed from their current homes and taken to foster care by social workers or law enforcement. The bags were filled with items like stuffed toys, a blanket, hygiene supplies, coloring books and more and picked up that afternoon by the non-profit organization Together We Rise, a national effort to support foster youth. Included were supportive cards made by the marketing team with positive and inspiring messages. Transitioning to foster care is a stressful process that can be traumatic for the kids. Foster dad Nick Koonce, manager of web services for marketing, knows this due to the experience of his foster daughter, who is now a successful college student. “Her parents were unable to care for her, due to their substance abuse, mental health issues and frequent incarceration. She had been raised by her elderly grandparents, who passed away and she was left with no one able to be responsible for her. She came to us wanting for nothing of material value. All she needed was a stable foundation, encouragement, understanding and love,” Koonce recalled. But as part of the experience of leaving her former home, the belongings she needed to take with her were tossed into a garbage bag. “A suitcase or duffle bag would have spared our daughter some psychological damage during a very traumatic transition. Placing her possessions in a garbage bag sent her the message that she and her belongings were disposable,” noted Koonce. He did some research and learned more about the realities such programs face. “California’s Department of Social Services and their Child Protective Services wing, is a very challenged bureaucracy that lacks the funding to provide such luxuries as a duffle bag. Luckily, the foster youth they serve, receive a lot of support from local non-profit organizations. As an aside, I’ve been inspired to form a supporting non-profit and you can learn more on the website Ruff-start.org.” The volunteer activity was organized by Lexi Beausoleil, a marketing campaigns specialist in Santa Barbara who volunteers in her free time as a Court Appointed Special Advocate (CASA) for children in foster care. “In Santa Barbara County alone, we have about 50 abused or neglected children that enter foster care every month. The removal can be very traumatic as little ones don’t always understand what’s happening. Children of any age can feel like they are the ones being punished and like they and their feelings don’t matter,” Beausoleil said. “And in most cases when a child is removed they are given just a garbage bag to quickly gather a few clothes and personal items. That’s why I am so pleased that organizations like Together We Rise have recognized this opportunity to do more to support these kids by providing the duffel bags that we decorated with cheerful images and messages and filled with items designed to bring comfort and reassurance. The blanket that’s included is even wrapped with the message, ‘You matter.’” Given her own experiences with the CASA program, Beausoleil knows that a duffle bag might seem like a small gift, but it is likely to make a big difference. And those homemade cards might provide words of comfort when they are needed most. “Thinking back on the kids I’ve worked with and how hard those first few weeks were for them, it makes me so happy to know that now there will be some kids who have a little bit better experience, whose day is just a little less hard because of the gift of these bags that we made for them here at Yardi.  I also hope...

Oak City Soccer Aug19

Oak City Soccer

Established in 2016, Oak City Soccer provides active, hands-on programming to help children with autism, ADHD, sensory processing disorder, and anxiety. Through activities, particularly soccer,  youth improve motor functions, establish social skills, and experience fun and acceptance in a team setting. The program has changed the lives of hundreds of children living in Cary and Wake Forest, North Carolina. Yardi Raleigh recently formed a relationship with Oak City Soccer that has been inspiring and uplifting Answering the Call The relationship began during the Yardi Cares Committee’s annual request for grant nominations. Each year, Yardi offices around the world receive a sum of funds to allocate the local non-profit organizations. “When the Yardi Cares Committee asked for suggestions for organizations to support, I immediately thought of Oak City Soccer,” says Thomas Duncan, Technical Account Manager, Residential NC – Consulting Practice 2 at Yardi. “They are also local to our Yardi Raleigh office and I really wanted to help out some local charities in addition to larger, state-wide charities.” After reviewing the nomination and researching the organization, the committee casted its votes. Oak City Soccer joined the league of grant recipients for the year! Yardi’s donation supported the expansion of Oak City Soccer to a second location, expanding from Cary to Wake Forest. Additionally, the funds provided scholarships to low-income families, as well as the replacement of worn out supplies such as soccer balls, new therapeutic tools, and visual cues. Roxy Shelley, Executive Director of Oak City Soccer, received the donation on behalf of Oak City Soccer. “Thanks so much to Thomas for the nomination, and Yardi for the amazing support this past year. We are truly grateful!” More than a Game Shelley has witnessed the way that the Oak City Soccer impacts kids on a...

Lending a Hand

The YMCA had a positive impact on Michael Berton’s life when he was growing up, as a place where he attended both day care and summer camp. As an adult, the Yardi proposal writer has found multiple ways to give back to the community nonprofit. As a part time development specialist for the organization, Berton has raised more than $150,000 in grant funding for the Lompoc branch of the YMCA. Most recently, he arranged for Yardi’s corporate headquarters to contribute several used computers for a new Teen Study Hall. For families without computers or Wi-Fi in their homes, options for access are limited to the school library on campus at Lompoc High or the local public library, which closes at 7pm. “The YMCA identified a need when teens asked for a safe place to complete their homework and to study,” Berton explained. “Teens will use the computers to access research sites for term papers and reports, complete homework assignments, and apply for grants, scholarships, FASFA, colleges, and jobs. The branch is located right next to the high school and will provide teens with a safe place to study that is close to their homes.” Yardi was pleased to be able to donate several gently used computers for the new Study Hall. In his capacity as a grant writer for the organization, Berton helps facilitate access to programs and membership services by securing funds through grants from foundations and businesses. “The Lompoc YMCA is in a unique situation, lacking support from major corporations, foundations, and individuals with large philanthropic means. Therefore, raising funds for the Y’s mission through foundations and grant writing is key to raising funds for the branch, which has 40% of their members on scholarships,” he explained. At Yardi, Berton has worked...

Building Futures Aug02

Building Futures

Women’s Economic Ventures (WEV) offers microenterprise development services to female entrepreneurs in California’s Central Coast. Trainees receive self-employment training through a proprietary curriculum and loans that enrich the diversity of businesses and opportunities in the area. WEV has helped more than 6,500 clients jump start 4,000 businesses. More than $4 million in loans have supported the dreams of borrowers who do not qualify for conventional products. These combined forces have created about 8,000 local jobs. In addition to WEV’s work in the Santa Barbara area, the organization has extended some of its services to women in Texas, Hungary, Nepal, Amman, and Jordan. While great strides have been made since the inception of WEV in 1991, there is still a lot of work to be done to reach economic parity. WEV’s Business Recovery Specialist Nicki Pharr explains, “Women currently own about 38 percent of all businesses, but they generate only 25 percent of the annual revenues as their male counterparts. 71 percent of woman-owned businesses generate less than $25,000 in annual receipts and only 1.8 percent reach a million dollars in annual sales.” Research suggests that confidence and access to capital are two of the main reasons why women fall behind. Pharr says, “Women start businesses with roughly half the capital as men. A growing body of research indicates that confidence is as important as competence as a determinant of success and women exhibit much less confidence than men. We need to close the confidence gap so women don’t opt out of competitive but lucrative opportunities to start scalable businesses in male-dominated fields, and we need to continue to help women acquire the business acumen and skills they need to grow bigger businesses.” WEV in Action Pharr has known that she wanted to connect with WEV ever since...

CAPSA Cares Jul30

CAPSA Cares

When James Boyd joined the staff of CAPSA (Citizens Against Physical & Sexual Abuse) in Utah’s Cache Valley and began wearing a nametag that publicly declared his affiliation with the organization, he learned a distressing truth: far more people than he could ever imagined had suffered rape, sexual abuse or domestic violence. People he knew as friends, neighbors, even members of his own family suddenly felt safe to share their experiences with him. “It happens way more than we realize. Statistics say one in four women and one in seven men will experience a violent or abusive relationship in their lifetimes. The incident rates are that high, and no one ever talks about it,” said Boyd, who serves as development director for the organization. Founded in the 1970s and based in Logan, Utah, CAPSA has a long history of acting as a support and advocacy network for abuse victims. The organization originated with a focus helping those who had been victims of rape. Today, awareness and assistance is most frequently needed for those suffering domestic violence. “Each year we help almost 1,500 individuals, shelter as many as 400 children, men and women. Our services include things like emergency shelter to get out of a dangerous situation, or short-term housing while they find a job and a new place to live. We have therapists who specialize in healing from the trauma associated with domestic violence and abuse. Our advocates who go to court with our clients. Our goal as an organization is to help people get out of dangerous situations and start the healing process,” Boyd said. The organization is very proud to be the first shelter in Utah to never turn away victims seeking a place to stay due to violence at home. If...

End Hunger Games Jun26

End Hunger Games

The End Hunger Games have been a Foodbank of Santa Barbara County tradition for five years. This winter holiday campaign adds a dose of friendly competition to local corporate philanthropy. Each year, 10-15 corporate teams compete to be crowned as the biggest givers. Yardi has participated in the End Hunger Games since its inception. “We use Yardi activities as examples to inspire the other teams to go above and beyond,” says Nathalie Keller, Corporate Giving Manager at the Foodbank of Santa Barbara County. “They have several teams within the company. They volunteer regularly, donate food, post on social channels, and plan events like their holiday boutique and company party to benefit the Foodbank.” Yardi emerged as the victor of the fifth annual End Hunger Games, followed closely by other fine local organizations: First place: Yardi – Total Points: 1466 Second place: Evidation Health  – Total points: 1457 Third place: FastSpring – Total Points: 1327 The vast outpouring of corporate support, coupled with donations from the community, could not have come at a better time. The Thomas Fire, one of the largest and costly in the state’s history, caused widespread dislocation and loss of property. For the Foodbank, the efforts to provide for daily community food needs were made even more challenging by this disaster. Keller explains, “Children and families experienced increased food insecurity during this time of crisis. Many were unable to work because businesses had shut down or reduced work hours during the emergency. This meant that hourly employees faced sudden loss of wages. Owners of businesses connected to tourism and recreation, along with service providers and vendors, experienced immediate loss of income.” As soon as the UCSB American Red Cross shelter opened, the Foodbank began providing food, water and snacks to evacuees. Two...

Yardi Boston

Yardi Boston recently participated in a Garden Party project at Somerville Village that will bring therapeutic and educational resources to young women in transitional housing. The project reflects how humble beginnings can be transformed into spectacular endings. About Somerville Village Somerville Village is a collaboration between Focus and The Home for Little Wanderers. The former is a Massachusetts-based non-profit that advocates and supports affordable housing as well as services for its residents. The latter offers programming to strengthen vulnerable families and keep children safe in their communities. Together, the organizations launched Somerville Village, transitional housing and programing to help young women who have aged-out of The Home for Little Wanderers yet need additional assistance to pursue higher education. Somerville Village is a two-story house with 15 bedrooms, five bathrooms, a kitchen and several communal spaces. Residents have easy access to public transportation, allowing them to commute to their post-secondary classes. In addition to housing, Somerville Village also provides access to therapeutic and educational support for residents as they take additional steps towards independence. The Garden Party When Yardi Boston team members arrived at Somerville Village, they found a lovely home with one aesthetic flaw: an underused side yard in serious need of attention. The organization wanted to transform the space into an educational and functional garden. Yardi was there to help. Rick Houpt, Development, The Home for Little Wanderers, explains, “The Yardi team absolutely transformed a dreary, black-padded side-yard into a cheerful educational and therapeutic space: a garden of raised beds for vegetables, herbs, and flowers.” The garden is an educational opportunity because the women of Somerville Village will have the chance to learn about nutrition, gardening, and growing food. The resource can help them take better care of bodies and minds, reaping the...

Bright Minds

California faces a dramatic shortfall of college-educated workers. According to the Public Policy Institute of California, by 2030, the state will be more than a million bachelor’s degrees short of what its innovation economy requires to thrive. In other words, if every college and every university in the state of California continues to graduate students at the current rate, the state will still be more than 1 million degrees short of what employers need. California State University Channel Islands (CSUCI) is positioned to help meet the needs of the state’s growing economy. The university has committed to addressing that shortfall by serving a largely first generation, underserved student population. CSU Channel Islands’ Solution “CSUCI is about access to education. We believe that we play a pivotal role in equity and social mobility for vulnerable populations with in our region, state, and our nation,” says Nichole Ipach, Vice President for University Advancement. The large majority of the university’s populations come from first generation, underserved, low-income, and underrepresented groups. Such populations are critical to filling the state’s need for college-educated workers. “Serving these populations is at the heart of our mission at CSUCI. In fact, CSUCI was ranked 18th in the nation for social mobility just this year,” says Ipach. The student population at CSUCI is 50 percent Hispanic, where 60 percent are the first generation in their families to go to college. About 80 percent of students are qualified for financial aid, creating tremendous social mobility opportunities for graduates. Student Focus Leads to Statewide Success George Leis, the President of Montecito Bank and Trust and the currently the CSUCI Foundation Board Chair, has been a proud member of the CSUCI Foundation Board for almost 10 years. Over that time, he watched the university change the lives of...

Cycling for a Cause May28

Cycling for a Cause

Yardi client Prologis is the presenting sponsor of the Courage Classic Bicycle Tour, a mult-day cycling event set for July 21-22 that raises money for Children’s Hospital Colorado. In 9 years of sponsorship, Prologis has raised $2 million for the hospital’s foundation. Yardi is proud to support fundraising efforts for this important cause by making a donation in support of the event each year. This July, Prologis has gathered a team of 100 riders with a goal of raising $150,000 for the hospital. The ride takes place from a base of the Copper Mountain Resort in Vail, Colo, elevation 9,750 feet. Participants chose from routes of around 80 or 40 miles on each of the two days. Shorter routes are available to families bringing children to participate. “The Courage Classic provides a great bonding experience and a unique opportunity to spend time with colleagues and business partners from around the world,” shared the Prologis marketing team. A global logistics real estate company, Prologis has over 1,600 employees in 19 countries. Yardi software helps facilitate the company’s partnership with the world’s major manufacturing and distribution companies. “Children’s Hospital Colorado Foundation is so grateful for the partnership with Prologis as our Presenting Sponsor of the Courage Classic Bicycle Tour. This event wouldn’t be what it has become today without their commitment,” said Emily Kotas, Senior Manager, Corporate Partnerships for Children’s Hospital Colorado. Learn more about the...

United Way Shoebox May18

United Way Shoebox

Before you discard an empty shoebox or a duplicate Happy Meal toy, think again. Those seemingly small items can go a long way toward promoting health and happiness for women and children in need. The Shoebox Project is a program hosted by the United Way. A few weeks before Mother’s Day each year, United Way delivers shoeboxes filled with essential items to women in homeless shelters, often mothers. The shoeboxes are filled and wrapped by volunteers. Yardi Atlanta has participated in the Shoebox Project for as long as anyone in the office can remember. It’s a year-long process. Employees contribute a variety of supplies such as toiletries, feminine hygiene products, first aid supplies, small toys, crayons, ponchos and socks. Then at the end of April, the supplies culminate into one large donation. Marilyn Duffield, Residential Project Manager, Client Services at Yardi explains the process once the items are collected: “We setup a conference room for people to stop by at their convenience—on lunch, between calls, at the end of the day—to wrap a shoebox or two, fill it with items from our stock-pile, and place a rubber band around it. We also collect monetary donations to use for wrapping paper or to buy more of an item that we need,” says Duffield. The versatility of the shoebox project allows all employees to get involved. Volunteers donate time, money, or items. Employees are encouraged to get creative with low- or no-cost options by bringing in extra hotel soaps or free toothbrushes from the dentist. When the 2018 project ended, Yardi delivered 115 boxes to the United Way. The donations completely filled Duffield’s car. “It is a feel-good project that reaches women and children all over Metro Atlanta,” smiles Duffield. “It’s such a great way to...

UCSB TMP May11

UCSB TMP

One of the most innovative programs on the UC Santa Barbara campus, the Technology Management Program (TMP) benefits students, employers, and the community at large. The TMP focuses on practical applications of tech and engineering skills in the workplace, and now offers a fast-tracked master’s degree program for those wishing to further their education. “We think we have a very unique program that is designed to accelerate how quickly an early-career engineer or scientist can become a leader in a technology company, by emphasizing human capital skills like communication and leadership,” said David Telleen-Lawton, Career Development Manager for the TMP. In the process of developing the Masters in Technology Management (MTM) track, a team from TMP conducted extensive market validation research, including speaking with executives at 24 local, Bay Area, and Southern California tech companies, including Yardi (pictured), to determine what skill sets and educational backgrounds were most needed. “We learned that companies need more software developers. They also told us that they could not find enough technically trained people that would take initiative. They need people who see the bigger picture and realize that the organizational problems are often more intransigent than the technical problems,” Telleen-Lawton shared. The MTM team also met with potential program students, where they learned that interest in the program was not just from engineers and scientists, but others with non-technical degrees already or wanting to work in the tech space. As a result, the MTM “is a curriculum of leadership skills for those who are comfortable working at fast-moving technology companies,” Telleen-Lawton said. The nine-month program is designed to quickly return students to the job market after packing in a year of management-level education focused on business, leadership, human resources, and product marketing. TMP leaders are proud to...

March for Babies Apr23

March for Babies

Yardi Atlanta recently reached and exceeded its fundraising goal for the March of Dimes walk. The office planned to raise $500 yet ended the day with $682! The fundraiser was a terrific way to boost morale and raise awareness for the upcoming March of Dimes March for Babies on April 28, 2018. The Organization March of Dimes understands that no one anticipates a baby born prematurely or very sick. Yet for hundreds of thousands of parents in the United States, that is the frightening reality. Each year, more than half a million babies are born premature or with birth defects. March of Dimes supports the efforts of parents and newborn intensive care unit (NICU) staff to save the lives of babies. Without the Affordable Care Act and March of Dimes support, most families would not be able to afford NICU services. Yet care doesn’t start in the NICU. March of Dimes also funds vital services for mothers. With early care, mothers and specialists can identify and minimize risks of preterm birth and birth defects. Yardi Atlanta + March of Dimes Last year, the Atlanta office supported March of Dimes for the first time as a group. Several families that had experienced premature childbirth, as well as those who have been affected, rallied together. Support for the cause grew into an office-wide effort this year. Stacy Harmon, Senior Quality Assurance Specialist Programming at Yardi, will be participating in the walk. “My son RJ (pictured at right and left) was six weeks premature,” says Harmon. “As scared as we were, we really had no need to worry. He was well taken care of while in the NICU for the 10 days after he was born. He was tested, fed, changed and even dressed while they watched...

Miles for Moms 5K Apr09

Miles for Moms 5K

Yardi is the presenting sponsor of the upcoming Miles for Moms 5K, a fun run and walk on Mother’s Day weekend that will benefit Goleta Valley Cottage Hospital. The run will take place on Saturday, May 12, the day before Mother’s Day. Participants are encouraged to walk with or in honor of mothers by Cottage Hospital organizers. “We are very excited about kicking off our very first Miles for Moms event,” said Arie Dejong, Vice President of Goleta Valley Cottage Hospital and Cottage Rehabilitation Hospital. “We hope runners and walkers will come out to join us in honoring moms, as well as helping to support the hospital’s fundraising efforts.” The route of the 5K will be familiar to many lunchtime joggers at Yardi’s corporate headquarters. Beginning at the Goleta Valley Cottage Hospital parking lot at 351 S. Patterson Ave., the 5K route will travel south on Patterson and onto the Atascadero Creek Trail (Obern Trail). The route will turn back at Highway 217 and return to the hospital. A fun run for kids will also be part of the morning events, and registration is free for kids under 12. Prizes will be awarded to the top fundraiser, as well as first place prizes to female and male runners. All moms participating in the event will receive a special gift and various raffle prizes will be given away. A DJ will play music for the entire duration of the event. To register, visit eventbrite.com/e/miles-for-moms-5k-goleta-valley-cottage-hospital-foundation-tickets-41508752797 Event Day Timeline: 7:30 am: On-site registration & packet pick up at Goleta Valley Cottage Hospital parking lot 9:00 am: Walk/run starts (participants arrive at start line by 8:45 am) 12:00 pm: Event ends at Goleta Valley Cottage Hospital parking lot For more information about Miles for Moms, visit cottagehealth.org/milesformoms. Explore more about how Yardi is Energized...

Emergency Backpacks

Two weeks ago, staff members from the Yardi corporate marketing and human resources departments in Santa Barbara, Calif. spent a few hours helping local non-profit organization Direct Relief assemble Emergency Medical Backpacks for first responders in disaster zones. For the marketing department the project was a peer energy team effort. Marketing colleagues assemble in small groups for regular activities like team building, socializing, friendly competitions and volunteer outings. The backpack packing effort required the coworkers to travel just a few blocks to the non-profit’s current warehouse, where backpacks and supplies were ready for assembly. (Direct Relief is currently building a new headquarters and warehouse space less than a mile from the Yardi corporate office in Goleta.) “After having a very difficult few months in our community with wildfires and the tragic debris flow, this opportunity to work together with our teams putting together medical backpacks for first responders was extremely uplifting. It felt really good that we could join together and do something that will help save lives, perhaps during another disaster like we had just experienced,” said Lexi Beausoleil, marketing campaign specialist for multifamily. Emergency Medical Backpacks include diagnostic items like a stethoscope and thermometers, infection control supplies like masks and gloves, personal protection tools like a headlamp and safety goggles, and trauma care supplies like bandages and iodine. “These Emergency Medical Backpacks are highly functional and durable, with appropriate and sufficient contents to meet critical disaster-related health needs, as well as the personal protective needs of skilled health workers providing treatment,” a Direct Relief spokesperson explained. Input from experienced emergency responders and field physicians informs the supply list. They are designed to grab-and-go for medical response volunteers or local responders able to provide on-site medical care and support during unexpected disasters or...

Marguerite’s Place Apr05

Marguerite’s Place

Marguerite’s Place takes a holistic approach to ending homelessness. The organization offers transitional housing, onsite childcare, as well as supportive services to break the cycle of homelessness and dependence for women and children. The nonprofit is nondenominational and service focused, with an emphasis on helping women and children who are facing housing insecurity. Over the years, Marguerite’s Place has grown into ten secure, affordable housing units that are fully furnished for families. In addition to transitional housing, services include educational assistance, career development training, referrals, and case management. Staff can also connect residents with legal counsel, mental health counseling, financial guidance, and peer mentoring. The ancillary services at Marguerite’s Place are what attracted Christa Tsechrintzis to the nonprofit. She’s currently the Director of Development. “I admired the guidance and intensive services that are provided to the residents to help them gain the confidence they need for self-sufficiency,” she says. While those services edify mothers, it’s the on-site childcare that often receives the greatest applause. “What sets us apart from other transitional living programs is our on-site childcare center,” says Tsechrintzis. “Our center is a Licensed Plus program as well as a designated ‘Strengthening Families’ center which means the care is centered around the wellness of the family as a whole.” Women can step from homelessness towards expanding their educations and advancing their careers without worrying about childcare expenses during the transition. That one component makes advancement more accessible for women. Once women have graduated from the transitional housing at Marguerite’s Place, they are eligible for MP Housing, a sister program with 10 condominiums. “MP Housing is a next step for our residents that have graduated through our program. They may stay in these condos for up to fives years and pay a rent that is...